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Window Glare is the enemy of drivers anywhere, whether you’re heading into the sun or against traffic at night, you do everything you can to avoid it.  It seems that no matter how much you clean the inside of your windshield, it’s still there.  Well home windows work in somewhat the same way, albeit they typically don’t pose any danger.  Window glare is annoying and it get’s worse when it’s directed onto your TV during the NC State game.  This pandemic has also shown us that computer glare can be agonizing and something that may result in moving around rooms.  However, there are ways to combat window glare.  

Window glare is simply light that is more intense than the light to which your eyes are adapted.  This results in light reflecting off the surface and distorting your field of view.  What results is generally an inability to see the screen and greatly reduced productivity.  There are many ways to combat window glare, however with some more suitable than others

The least technologically advanced option is to simply move your entire office around.  Ideally, your monitor will face directly opposite the window where light enters.  In that case, the light will never actually reach the screen and you’ll be able to see. The problem with that method is it’s just really impractical which leads us to our next remedies.  

Window coverings are important and some of the best ways to combat window glare.  Much like the tint in a car, you can buy “glare-control window film” which are basically just applicable sunglasses for windows.  This film simply sticks to the window and filters out a significant portion of the light while still being transparent.  Another avenue is incorporating semi-transparent blinds.  They are essentially fabric “solar shades” that can keep the room cooler, reduce glare but still let in a significant amount of natural light without being overwhelming.

Lastly, and something done to high end office buildings, the installation of window shelves greatly reduces the risk of glare.  These are “shelves” place high on windows that essentially block the highest intensity light due to the angle it enters the window.  Basically, the entire window can be open, uncovered with the exception of the shelf near the top.  This allows excellent natural light, good views and a huge reducing in the glare factor.  Something like this is usually done by a trained professional in commercial settings and is less used in residential applications.

Clearly, a significant amount of effort has been put into reducing glare and for good reason.  It is annoying, potentially damaging to your eyes and makes viewing screens nearly impossible.  Luckily there are solutions that range in complexity and scope for any application.